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Lavender Crème Brûlée

Crème brûlée. How to describe it? It’s a unique French delight that’s really incomparable to most of our American desserts. Imagine something with the texture of a super smooth, super creamy yogurt. Now with the sugary-sweet intensity of eating pure frosting. It’s like a vanilla pudding that has the sweetness of raw sugar. And it’s crazy rich. Each portion only filled half a ramekin, but by the end of the bowl my sweet tooth had been vanquished. Totally and completely. It’s seriously potent stuff. But wow. It was so, so, soooo good! Blissful.

And honestly, it’s mostly heavy cream that gets infused with a subtle lavender flavor. Which, as your taste buds can guess, only enhances the innately magical properties of a traditional crème brûlée.

So, since I’ve never made a crème brûlée before, I didn’t make a video of the process. It sounded like it might be tricky and I didn’t want any record of it, in case everything went wrong. So instead, I created a photo journal of the process. So enjoy the pretty pictures that will (hopefully) help walk you through the process. And since this whole photo journal idea was an experiment, be sure to let us know if the extra pictures helpful or not. Depending on your answer you may see more of them in the future. Or never again. But whatever your opinion, you should 100% make this recipe. It was simply divine and I want that for you. And your taste buds.

You deserve it.

AuthorMackieDifficultyIntermediate

 4 cups Heavy whipping cream
 1 tbsp Dried lavender flowers (culinary grade)
 8 Egg yolks
 ½ cup Sugar
 ¼ cup Sugar for the topping

1

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.
Grease six ramekins or small-ish heatproof bowls with butter; set aside. Next, find a baking dish of equal depth to the ramekins you're using. Eventually, this larger container with get filled with water and the individual crème brûlées will be baked submerged in it.

2

Combine the heavy whipping cream and lavender flowers in a saucepan over medium heat. Bring just to a simmer then remove from heat. Allow the mixture to rest for 5 minutes, so that the lavender flavor can infuse into the cream. Pour the cream through a sieve to strain out the lavender buds. Throw out the used buds.

3

In a large bowl, whisk the egg yolks with the sugar until light and creamy. Slowly add the heavy cream to beaten eggs, whisking constantly. Divide the mixture between the prepared ramekins, filling roughly half full.

4

Pour some water into a saucepan and bring to a simmer on the stove top. Pour the preheated water into the larger container you pulled out earlier; filling until the liquid is higher than the amount of custard in the ramekins. Be careful! On one hand, you do not want the water to come over the lip of your ramekin and dilute your dessert. But if you add too little water, your desserts will not bake properly. The water keeps the eggs in the cream from cooking too quickly and is what makes the texture so impossibly creamy.

5

Set the filled ramekins into the awaiting water bath. Bake the individual custards in the water bath for 60 minutes, or until the edges are set but the centers are still jiggly. The cook time will vary depending on the size of the ramekins you used and on the altitude where you live. After 30 minutes, start checking on your creations. Keep on eye on the water level as well; should too much evaporate, add more. The temperature should read between 170-175 degrees when done.

6

Remove the entire water bath, with the ramekins still floating in it, from the oven. Leave the bowls in the hot water until the water becomes room temperature. (You need to protect the eggs in the mixture from extreme temperature swings.) Once room temperature, place the cups of custard in the refrigerator for anywhere from 2 hours to 2 days.

7

Sprinkle 2 teaspoons of sugar over the top of each dessert. Using a hand torch, brown the sugar into a hard caramel layer over the surface of each individual custard. If you don't have a hand torch, simply place the cups under the oven's broiler for 4-6 minutes, or until the sugar starts to turns brown. Refrigerate for another 10 minutes (or more) before serving.

Ingredients

 4 cups Heavy whipping cream
 1 tbsp Dried lavender flowers (culinary grade)
 8 Egg yolks
 ½ cup Sugar
 ¼ cup Sugar for the topping

Directions

1

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.
Grease six ramekins or small-ish heatproof bowls with butter; set aside. Next, find a baking dish of equal depth to the ramekins you're using. Eventually, this larger container with get filled with water and the individual crème brûlées will be baked submerged in it.

2

Combine the heavy whipping cream and lavender flowers in a saucepan over medium heat. Bring just to a simmer then remove from heat. Allow the mixture to rest for 5 minutes, so that the lavender flavor can infuse into the cream. Pour the cream through a sieve to strain out the lavender buds. Throw out the used buds.

3

In a large bowl, whisk the egg yolks with the sugar until light and creamy. Slowly add the heavy cream to beaten eggs, whisking constantly. Divide the mixture between the prepared ramekins, filling roughly half full.

4

Pour some water into a saucepan and bring to a simmer on the stove top. Pour the preheated water into the larger container you pulled out earlier; filling until the liquid is higher than the amount of custard in the ramekins. Be careful! On one hand, you do not want the water to come over the lip of your ramekin and dilute your dessert. But if you add too little water, your desserts will not bake properly. The water keeps the eggs in the cream from cooking too quickly and is what makes the texture so impossibly creamy.

5

Set the filled ramekins into the awaiting water bath. Bake the individual custards in the water bath for 60 minutes, or until the edges are set but the centers are still jiggly. The cook time will vary depending on the size of the ramekins you used and on the altitude where you live. After 30 minutes, start checking on your creations. Keep on eye on the water level as well; should too much evaporate, add more. The temperature should read between 170-175 degrees when done.

6

Remove the entire water bath, with the ramekins still floating in it, from the oven. Leave the bowls in the hot water until the water becomes room temperature. (You need to protect the eggs in the mixture from extreme temperature swings.) Once room temperature, place the cups of custard in the refrigerator for anywhere from 2 hours to 2 days.

7

Sprinkle 2 teaspoons of sugar over the top of each dessert. Using a hand torch, brown the sugar into a hard caramel layer over the surface of each individual custard. If you don't have a hand torch, simply place the cups under the oven's broiler for 4-6 minutes, or until the sugar starts to turns brown. Refrigerate for another 10 minutes (or more) before serving.

Lavender Crème Brûlée

Thanks to What’s Cooking America for the recipe!

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